Tails from the Clinic: Kierra the Husky's Hotspot

Tails from the Clinic: Kierra the Husky's Hotspot

by Tasha Phillips, M.S.

Kierra, an eight-year-old female husky, was presented with a large palm-size lesion on her groin that her owner noticed her licking excessively. Kierra is an outdoor dog prone to skin infections due to her thick undercoat and damp conditions. Kierra had acute moist dermatitis (hot spot) between her two hind legs about 5 inches across.  The area was shaved and scrubbed thoroughly with a chlorhexadine scrub and Lavengel was applied evenly over the wound.

Kierra went home and the wound was cleaned twice daily and Lavengel applied. Kierra was also given Carprofen® 100mg ½ tablet twice daily by mouth for pain.

The wound responded to treatment within 1 day, showing significantly decreased irritation to Kierra. She did continue to lick the wound occasionally and Lavengel was still effective in reducing inflammation, microbial burden, and promoting new skin formation. She did not show any signs of reaction to Lavengel or any adverse complications.

The area was completely healed within approximately two weeks from the first application. The owner was thrilled with the results, how quickly the product took effect, and the overall ease of use with Lavengel–not to mention the wonderful smell. She continues to use it for Kierra anytime an issue arises with her skin as a first line of defense.

Three images of healing progression of hotspot on groin of Siberian Husky treated with Lavengel over 14 day period

For more on canine hotspots, see our Ultimate Hotspot Guide.

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Tasha Nelson, M.S., Researcher and Veterinary Assistant

Tasha Nelson Phillips is a veterinary assistant and researcher. She began her work in veterinary medicine in 2014 at a small practice in East Tennessee. She has a B.S. in Biology as well as a Master’s degree in Microbiology from East Tennessee State University. Her undergraduate and graduate research focused on Lavengel®, exploring its efficacy and mechanism of action against common bacterial species.

Tasha’s interests focus on natural antimicrobial options and exploring novel compounds to combat antibiotic resistance. She continues to work in small animal emergency and critical care medicine. She spends her free time with her husband and three furry babies in their East Tennessee home.

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